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Authors: Daniel Silva

Tags: #Fiction, #Thrillers, #Espionage, #General, #Suspense

Portrait of a Spy

BOOK: Portrait of a Spy
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PORTRAIT OF A SPY

DANIEL SILVA

Dedication
For my wonderful children, Nicholas and Lily,
whom I love and admire more than they will
ever know. And, as always, for my wife, Jamie, who
makes everything possible.

Epigraph

 

 

Jihad is becoming as American as apple pie
and as British as afternoon tea.

ANWAR AL-AWLAKI, AL-QAEDA PREACHER AND RECRUITER

One person of integrity can make a difference,
a difference of life and death.

ELIE WIESEL

Contents

 

Cover

Title Page

Dedication

Epigraph

 

 

PART ONE

    

Chapter 1 - The Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall

    

Chapter 2 - Paris

    

Chapter 3 - St. James’s, London

    

Chapter 4 - Covent Garden, London

    

Chapter 5 - Covent Garden, London

    

Chapter 6 - Covent Garden, London

    

Chapter 7 - New Scotland Yard, London

    

Chapter 8 - New York City

    

Chapter 9 - The Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall

    

Chapter 10 - Lizard Point, Cornwall

    

Chapter 11 - Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 12 - Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 13 - Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 14 - Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 15 - Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 16 - Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 17 - Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 18 - Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 19 - Volta Park, Washington, D.C.

    

Chapter 20 - The Palisades, Washington, D.C.

 

 

PART TWO

    

Chapter 21 - New York City

    

Chapter 22 - Madrid-Paris

    

Chapter 23 - Paris

    

Chapter 24 - Paris

    

Chapter 25 - Seraincourt, France

    

Chapter 26 - Montmartre, Paris

    

Chapter 27 - Paris

    

Chapter 28 - Seraincourt, France

    

Chapter 29 - Seraincourt, France

    

Chapter 30 - Seraincourt, France

    

Chapter 31 - Seraincourt, France

    

Chapter 32 - Seraincourt, France

    

Chapter 33 - Seraincourt, France

    

Chapter 34 - St. James’s, London

    

Chapter 35 - Zurich

    

Chapter 36 - Lake Zurich

    

Chapter 37 - Lake Zurich

    

Chapter 38 - Paris

    

Chapter 39 - Zurich

    

Chapter 40 - Langley, Virginia

    

Chapter 41 - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    

Chapter 42 - Nejd, Saudi Arabia

    

Chapter 43 - Nejd, Saudi Arabia

    

Chapter 44 - St. James’s, London

    

Chapter 45 - St. James’s, London

    

Chapter 46 - Langley, Virginia

    

Chapter 47 - The Palisades, Washington, D.C.

 

 

PART THREE

    

Chapter 48 - The Plains, Virginia

    

Chapter 49 - The Plains, Virginia

    

Chapter 50 - The Plains, Virginia

    

Chapter 51 - The City, London

    

Chapter 52 - The City, London

    

Chapter 53 - The City, London

    

Chapter 54 - Dubai

    

Chapter 55 - Dubai International Airport

    

Chapter 56 - Burj Al Arab Hotel, Dubai

    

Chapter 57 - Langley, Virginia

    

Chapter 58 - Burj Al Arab Hotel, Dubai

    

Chapter 59 - Burj Al Arab Hotel, Dubai

    

Chapter 60 - Burj Al Arab Hotel, Dubai

    

Chapter 61 - Dubai

    

Chapter 62 - Deira, Dubai

    

Chapter 63 - The Empty Quarter, Saudi Arabia

    

Chapter 64 - The Empty Quarter, Saudi Arabia

    

Chapter 65 - The Empty Quarter, Saudi Arabia

    

Chapter 66 - The Empty Quarter, Saudi Arabia

 

 

PART FOUR

    

Chapter 67 - Paris-Langley-Riyadh

    

Chapter 68 - The Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall

    

Chapter 69 - New York City

    

Chapter 70 - Langley, Virginia

    

Chapter 71 - The Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall

Author’s Note

Acknowledgments

 

 

About the Author

Also by Daniel Silva

Copyright

About the Publisher

PART ONE

DEATH IN THE GARDEN

Chapter 1
The Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall

 

 

I
T WAS THE
R
EMBRANDT THAT
solved the mystery once and for all. Afterward, in the quaint shops where they did their marketing and the dark little seaside pubs where they did their drinking, they would chide themselves for having missed the telltale signs, and they would share a good-natured laugh at some of their more outlandish theories about the true nature of his work. Because in their wildest dreams there was not one among them who ever considered the possibility that the taciturn man from the far end of Gunwalloe Cove was an art restorer, and a world-famous art restorer at that.

He was not the first outsider to wander down to Cornwall with a secret to keep, yet few had guarded theirs more jealously, or with more style and intrigue. A case in point was the peculiar manner in which he had secured lodgings for himself and his beautiful but much younger wife. Having chosen the picturesque cottage at the edge of the cliffs—by all accounts, sight unseen—he had paid the entire twelve-month lease in advance, with all the paperwork handled discreetly by an obscure lawyer in Hamburg. He settled into the cottage a fortnight later as if he were conducting a raid on a distant enemy outpost. Those who met him during his first forays into the village were struck by his notable lack of candor. He seemed to have no name—at least not one he was willing to share—and no country of origin that any of them could place. Duncan Reynolds, thirty years retired from the railroad and regarded as the worldliest of Gunwalloe’s residents, described him as “a cipher of a man” while other reviews ranged from “standoffish” to “unbearably rude.” Even so, all agreed that, for better or worse, the little west Cornish village of Gunwalloe had become a far more interesting place.

With time, they were able to establish that his name was Giovanni Rossi and that, like his beautiful wife, he was of Italian descent. Which made it all the more curious when they began to notice government-issue cars filled with government-issue men prowling the streets of the village late at night. And then there were the two blokes who sometimes fished the cove. Opinion was universal that they were the worst fishermen anyone had ever seen. In fact, most assumed they were not fishermen at all. Naturally, as is wont to happen in a small village like Gunwalloe, there began an intense debate about the true identity of the newcomer and the nature of his work—a debate that was finally resolved by
Portrait of a Young Woman
, oil on canvas, 104 by 86 centimeters, by Rembrandt van Rijn.

Precisely when it arrived would never be clear. They assumed it was sometime in mid-January because that was when they noticed a dramatic change in his daily routine. One day he was marching along the rugged cliff tops of the Lizard Peninsula as though wrestling with a guilty conscience; the next he was standing before an easel in his living room, a paintbrush in one hand, a palette in the other, and opera music blasting so loudly you could hear the wailing clear across Mount’s Bay in Marazion. Given the proximity of his cottage to the Coastal Path, it was possible—if one paused in just the right spot, mind you, and craned one’s neck at just the right angle—to see him in his studio. At first, they assumed he was working on a painting of his own. But as the weeks ground slowly past, it became clear he was involved in the craft known as conservation or, more commonly, as restoration.

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